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Article in Stormwater Magazine (2011): “Rainwater Management in a Watershed Context – What’s the Goal?”

Note to Reader:

In its November-December 2010 issue, Stormwater magazine launched the Green Infrastructure & Community Design Series. Articles in the series have been contributed by members of the Rainwater-in-Context Initative, a sub-committee of the Congress for the New Urbanism (CNU) in the United States.

The most recent article in the series was co-authored by Kim Stephens and Jim Dumont, Canadian contributors to the Rainwater-inh-Context Initiative. The article elaborates on how science-based understanding has informed the process for moving from awareness to action in British Columbia. The article also provides the “convening for action” context for development and application of the Water Balance Model to achieve green infrastructure outcomes.

To download a copy of the article click on Rainwater Management in a Watershed Context.

Integrated Strategy for Managing the Rainfall Spectrum & Mimicking the Water Balance

Integrated Strategy for Managing the Rainfall Spectrum & Mimicking the Water Balance

Responsible Rainwater Management

In both Canada and the United States, there is a growing green infrastructure movement. This reflects a heightened public awareness of the need to build our communities differently. Also, land use and infrastructure professionals increasingly appreciate that effective green infrastructure is at the heart of responsible rainwater management.

The View From British Columbia

“The article is written from a British Columbia perspective,” states Kim Stephens, Executive Director, Partnership for Water Sustainability in British Columbia. “The article connects the dots between recent developments in the United States, such as A Strategic Agenda to Protect Waters and Build More Livable Communities Through Green Infrastructure released by the United States EPA in April 2011, and comparable initiatives that have been underway in British Columbia for the past decade.”

“While land use and infrastructure professionals are using a similar vocabulary on both sides of the border, our goals appear different. The apparent divergence has significant implications for rainwater management in a watershed context.”

“The approach we have taken in British Columbia differs from that of the EPA due to the nature of the root problems being solved,” continues Jim Dumont. “The critical issue in British Columbia is the damage and loss of habitat caused by development and erosion of the headwater streams. The focus is in direct response to Canada’s Fisheries Act that prohibits damage of fish habitat.”

“EPA has focussed upon water quality in the main stems and coastal waters and seeks to restore the resources of those waters through the goals and objectives of the Clean Water Act.”

 

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